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Rwanda

March 23, 2005

Hotel Rwanda got me started on the subject of the Rwandan genocide all over again. The movie is well made and is a personal story of a man who saved the lives of more than 1200 people (tutsis and moderate hutus) during the genocide. It is very easy to get carried away by the shock value that photos of mounds of dead bodies generate. Infact most news that comes out of Africa today refers to clashes and tells us of the number of people dead with more horrifying pictures. We arent usually exposed to the analysis – historical, ethnic and psychological as to why the clashes occurred. But Hotel Rwanda manages to tell a gripping story of the man(Paul Rusesabeguna) himself and how he managed to keep these people alive.

The book “Season of Blood” by Fergal Keane is another personal story of a journalist with the BBC who ventured into the country immediately after the genocide. The author tells us of a situation in the BBC radio station in Johannesburg where the subject of Central Africa comes up. He makes a statement about the increasing danger of a catastrophe in the region. Another correspondent wondered aloud why they should care about disputes in obscure countries. He answers with the following line.

“We should care because we belong to the same brotherhood of man as the citizens of seemingly remote African countries. It is not a political reason and some may call it naive. That is their prerogative. For me, however, the conclusion is unavoidable: genocidal killing in Africa diminishes all of us”

This is exactly the way I feel about genocide. Toothless international organizations like the UN and the rest of the world (France, US and the rest of the western world) are co-conspirators of this genocide. France, directly since they supported the hutu extremists and supplemented their machetes with guns and ammunition and supplies. If we are only going to wait and watch while these tragedies unfold before us then we are as guilty as the machete wielding Interahamwe (the Hutu extremist army). This is happening again in Sudan. All the UN report says is that it isnt genocide. Like that gives them the moral high ground to not do anything. Does it really matter whether thousands of people being killed amounts to genocide or not for the international community to act? Lets remember the 1million people of Rwanda. Yes, 1 million. They didnt give their lives for nothing.

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From → Politics

7 Comments
  1. Wendelin The Weird permalink

    Interesting. I seem to be persona non grata on this blog.

    😛

  2. Wendelin The Weird permalink

    Interesting. I seem to be persona non grata on this blog.

    😛

  3. Wendelin The Weird permalink

    “We should care because we belong to the same brotherhood of man as the citizens of seemingly remote African countries. … For me … the conclusion is unavoidable: genocidal killing in Africa diminishes all of us”

    This quote echoes:
    “No man is an island, entire of itself. Every man is a part of the continent, a piece of the main… Every man’s death diminishes me, for I am involved in mankind.” ~John Donne

  4. sushil permalink

    nanni!
    nope nope. not persona non grata at all. blof still under contstruction like links et all. will soon put up many more.

    nice quote.is john donne the guy who wrote lorna doone? or am i just mixing last names?

  5. Wendelin The Weird permalink

    John Donne is a poet fellow, inventor of the phrase “for whom the bell tolls”. Lorna Doone was a character in a book by Richard Blackmore!

  6. Anonymous permalink

    Hey Sushil you’re back. write more!

    Re your blog: what is not forgotten is what the Western media doesnt want you to forget. This implies Western white folk (usually Jews) were victims. Other than that, everything is a non issue: Stalin’s gulag, Turkish genocide in Armenia, Ind-Pak partition, Pak in Bangladesh, Rwanda of course, to give only recent examples.

    saurabh

  7. Angelsera permalink

    I saw this report on OPERA about African women and how they are suffering in the hands of the rebels.

    How they frequently get gang raped while their husbands who are usually tied up some where nearby are made to watch. Worse still, sometimes sons are forced to rape their mothers, fathers their daughter and brothers their sisters. A lot of times, these women have children of their rapists, some times at the age of 13.
    Most often the husbands, ashamed that their wives are carrying another’s baby or that they could do nothing but watch,leave the family or throw the wife out.

    I dont know how much of it was true, frankly I dont care if its not true, because I still believe its probably happening,in Africa and else where.

    Everytime I have heard the words “ethnic cleansing”, words like “genocide”, “rape” ,”village fires” seem to revolve around it.

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